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Elizabeth Johnson, Associate at Ashfords LLP is the feature of an exciting new film from the First 100 Years campaign

Elizabeth Johnson, Associate at Ashfords LLP, who was appointed as the first female CILEx judge earlier this year, is the feature of an exciting new film, the 'First 100 Years: Elizabeth Johnson', which premiered yesterday.

Elizabeth was handpicked to be the feature of the short film, as part of a series from the First 100 Years campaign by charity Spark21, which is celebrating 100 years since the Sex Disqualification (Removal) Act 1919 (Royal Assent 23 December 1919), which enabled women to join the professions for the first time – and allowed women to become barristers, solicitors, jurors and magistrates. Each film in the series follows a different woman's journey into law. 

In the film, Elizabeth talks through her story of becoming the first female CILEx judge of the First-tier Tribunal. Elizabeth explained how summer placements at a law firm when she was a teenager motivated her desire to be a lawyer, going on to qualify as a legal executive in 1998.

Elizabeth provides an insight into the reality of balancing legal life with a family, and how a revolutionary (at the time) home working pilot programme at her previous firm helped her progress in her career. She was pleased how becoming the first female CILEx judge has helped 'break the glass ceiling'. Elizabeth also explained how Ashfords supportive and flexible approach have allowed her to pursue her role as a judge, alongside being an Associate in the Insurance and Liability Claims Team. 

Elizabeth is also featured in the book recently launched, 'FIRST: 100 Years of Women in Law'  which you can order here.

Elizabeth says: "It was incredible to be involved in such a groundbreaking project which is celebrating the achievements of women in law over the last 100 years. Through becoming the first female CILex judge I am glad to have broken the glass ceiling, and I hope this is just the beginning of a journey in ensuring the judiciary is diverse and reflective of the people it serves. 

"However, there is still work to be done to ensure women in the profession have an 'strong and equal future', and that diversity and inclusion measures are prioritised for all so no one is limited in the profession." 

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